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data store

Discussion in 'C#' started by en0ne, Jul 20, 2008.

  1. en0ne

    en0ne New Member

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    When i develop my applications I always use databases or XML for storing data.
    Looking at the professional applications they don't have any database. What techniques do they use to store data?
    Is there any other technique for storing data other than using databases or XML?
    If someone has information on this item please let me know.
    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. imported_xpi0t0s

    imported_xpi0t0s New Member

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    Question doesn't make a lot of sense. Can you give some examples of the applications that don't have any database? You don't have to use databases or XML to store data; you can just open a file and bung it in there in any old format you want.
    If it's an application that doesn't have many data storage needs, e.g. a web browser, it can store its settings in the Registry (there are Temporary Internet Files of course, but that's more of an optimisation cache rather than a data store as such).
     
  3. en0ne

    en0ne New Member

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    My intention is to know about applications that don't use DBMS like SQL Server or MYSQL or Oracle etc.
    How do they store data and how do they create different datatypes to store their data.
     
  4. imported_xpi0t0s

    imported_xpi0t0s New Member

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    Depends on the application. Without concrete examples I've no way of knowing. In general though you don't need a database just to store data, you can just bung it in a file, storing the data in whatever format suits the application design requirements. If it's a requirement that the data files are juman readable then you might end up with something like the old Windows .INI files. If not then the files will be stored in binary which means only the software will be able to understand what is stored in them (or someone with a hex editor who (a) has lots of time or (b) knows the software).
    e.g.
    Code:
    struct mydata { ... };
    struct data TheData;
    fp=fopen("savefile","w");
    fwrite(fp, &TheData, sizeof(TheData));
    fclose(fp);
    
     
  5. en0ne

    en0ne New Member

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    Thank you xpi0t0s.
    The topic is clear for me now.
    I want to learn more on these techniques that you said, do you know any C# book that explains them in details?
     
  6. imported_xpi0t0s

    imported_xpi0t0s New Member

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    I imagine most would. Chapter 10 of O'Reilly CSharp in a Nutshell (2e), Chapter 9 of Microsoft C# programming for the absolute beginner and Chapter 18 of Prentice Hall - Visual C# 2005 How to Program (2e) all cover this stuff.
     

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