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problem with atoi ()

Discussion in 'C++' started by meyup, Jun 21, 2010.

  1. meyup

    meyup New Member

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    Hi,

    I have a problem with atoi ()
    My code is as follows:
    Code:
    # Include <stdlib.h> 
    # Include <stdio.h> 
    int main (void) ( 
        char* x = "f"; 
        int command; 
        command = atoi (x); 
        printf ("number:% d", command); 
       return 0; 
    )
    How to remove the link, atoi () returns 0 if could not be converted to char. with me, the program always 0 Why?
     
  2. techme

    techme New Member

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    because "f" is not a number. as simple as that
     
  3. creative

    creative New Member

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    what is a number "f" be? 1? 3? 19?
    if you work instead of "f" as "650" uses it.

    btw:
    printf is not c, cpp court and in 'real'?
     
  4. meyup

    meyup New Member

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    I probably hit the wrong function. in reality I would like to determine the ANSI code given by a letter that is then returned. I found the function in CharToInt R.oo, but I'd like something not so large scale. Is there something?
     
  5. inspiration

    inspiration New Member

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    What do you want exactly? What number should I get out at "f"?
     
  6. meyup

    meyup New Member

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    The ANSI code in which case, 69 decimal or 45 hex
     
  7. inspiration

    inspiration New Member

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    you can use
    Code:
    printf ("Number:% d", 'f');
     
  8. meyup

    meyup New Member

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    Thank you. But why, I tap in the dark and always think so complicated and it is so easy.
     
  9. meyup

    meyup New Member

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    since you are indeed benefit:

    why does it not here?

    Code:
    char* book = "x"; 
    int test = (int) book;     
    court <<"number: "<<test <<endl;
    It always returns 4,198,960th Why?
     
  10. pankaj.sea

    pankaj.sea New Member

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    that is the memory address of the chars
     
  11. techme

    techme New Member

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    nt test = (int) * book;
     
  12. meyup

    meyup New Member

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    I am now somewhat confused. of course it must be int (* char be). Thank you

    Does all the other way around? So in some book = char (test)? So it is not hot but how do this so that it's going?
     
  13. techme

    techme New Member

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    Code:
    int test = 120; 
    char book = test;
    use it.
     
  14. NewsBot

    NewsBot New Member

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    I am not sure if you have your answer or not but the function you are using takes character and not string.
     

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