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Error while compiling program

Discussion in 'C' started by ballurohit, Jun 11, 2012.

  1. ballurohit

    ballurohit New Member

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    I found error in compiling the file. The program file is annexed.

    (B.N.ROHIT)
    Kindly have your advice on it early.
     
  2. ballurohit

    ballurohit New Member

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    There is a compilor error.The copy of the program is annexed.
    #include <iostream.h>
    #include <stdlib.h>
    #include <errno.h>
    #ifndef LINE_NUM_H
    #define LINE_NUM_H
    #include "line_num.h"
    int main()

    {
    int _LINE_NUM;
    {
    cout<<"This is the line number:"<<_LINE_NUM <<endl;
    cout<<"line number is:"<<_LINE_NUM"," <<FILE NAME <<endl;
    cout<<"The Compiler gives a _cplusplus value of:";
    cin>>_LINE_NUM;
    return 0;
    }
    }
    #endif


    Pl. have some advice.
     
  3. hobbyist

    hobbyist New Member

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    What compiler are you using?? What is declared within line_num.h?? What compiler errors are being generated??

    Code:
     cout<<"This is the line number:"<<_LINE_NUM <<endl;
    
    _LINE_NUM hasn't been initialized yet

    Code:
     cout<<"line number is:"<<_LINE_NUM[b]","[/b] <<FILE NAME <<endl;
    
    you're missing << between _LINE_NUM and "," and FILE NAME has a white space.

    really old compilers don't have the std namespace and use the old style headers. If you're using a newer modern compiler, change the includes

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <cstdlib>
    #include <cerrno>
    
    using namespace std;
    ...
     
  4. ballurohit

    ballurohit New Member

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    I am using Turbo C compiler.In line_num.h I have used " Int main() { int_LINE_NUM;
    return 0;
    {
    Actually I have not initialized the variable. That is my mistake.
     
  5. hobbyist

    hobbyist New Member

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    The header file, line_num.h, should only be used for declaring typedefs, classes, global variables (if any), and function prototypes. function main() belongs in a source file such as .c or .cpp

    I'm not exactly sure what you're wanting to do. If you're wanting to print the macros __LINE__, __FILE__, and _cplusplus, then maybe try

    Code:
    #ifdef _cplusplus
    #define is_cpp 1
    #else
    #define is_cpp 0
    #endif
    
    cout << "this file is: " << __FILE__
          << "\n"
          << "this line is: " << __LINE__
          << "\n"
          << "_cplusplus defined is: " << is_cpp;
    
    _cplusplus doesn't seem to exist on the compiler I'm currently using. :|
     
  6. ballurohit

    ballurohit New Member

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    I desire to place the header file into the .cpp file for knowing the error line number exactly and nothing else.
     
  7. hobbyist

    hobbyist New Member

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    you'll need to trap any errors and take steps programmatically to rectify/report them. I don't know if turbo has try, catch, and throw or not but you might mill over the reference to see how they work. If your application is a debug build, you might also look into using assert. Lastly, you might try a macro in your header... maybe something like

    note: \ is intentional when spanning multiple lines; without it, the compiler will protest.

    Code:
    // take 3 arguments, the line near the error, 
    // the source file where the error occured, and
    // whether or not to clear the input stream
    
    #define errorState(errline, errfile, errflag) { \
       if(errflag == true) { \
          cin.clear(); \
          while(cin.get() != '\n'){} \
       } \
       cout << "error on line: " \
              << errline \
              << "\nin file: " \
              << errfile; \
    } \
    in your cpp file, you'd do something like

    Code:
    int n;
    cout << "Enter an integer: ";
    if(!(cin >> n)) 
       errorState(__LINE__, __FILE__, true);
    
    hope that helps
     
  8. ballurohit

    ballurohit New Member

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    what is that \ mark in the suggested program!
     
  9. hobbyist

    hobbyist New Member

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    it is required to span multiple lines

    Code:
    printf("hello \
             world"); // okay
    printf("hello
             world"); // compiler error
    
    in the #define errorState macro, \ is needed because the code spans multiple lines; that's all. :)
     

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