Relative grading system | Feb. 19, 2010

shabbir's Avatar, Join Date: Jul 2004
Go4Expert Founder
Relative grading system assumes one thing. If that assumption fails a very strange thing can happen. Can you guess what?
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Kshiteej's Avatar, Join Date: Jul 2009
Contributor
I think it assumes that majority of elements will be falling on average group.
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pankaj.sea's Avatar, Join Date: Apr 2009
Pro contributor
I think, if the assumption fails then there will be no difference between the first and the last!
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shabbir's Avatar, Join Date: Jul 2004
Go4Expert Founder
Can you please elaborate as I think you are close.
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Mridula's Avatar, Join Date: Mar 2008
Pro contributor
In Relative Grading System:

When a student could pass a class with an 'A' after having mastered only 40% of the material so long as that 40% placed them in the top of their particular class as made up of those particular students in that particular semester/section.

Conversely, a student in a class made up of other individuals taught another semester/section who has mastered 80% of the material might end up with an 'F' for the class if the rest of the students in the class all mastered the material at a higher level.

So ultimately, if the assumption fails, sometimes student who has scored less than pass percentage i.e. 35%, say he/she has scored 25% also could stand in "A" grade. Thats what it meant.
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shabbir's Avatar, Join Date: Jul 2004
Go4Expert Founder
In Relative Grading System there is nothing called a fail and pass
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pankaj.sea's Avatar, Join Date: Apr 2009
Pro contributor
okay!
In my view, relative grade system creates difference between you and me. Such as "Someone have got 90% so he/she is A graded student and as some one got 40% marks so he or she is a C graded student!" etc. So if the system fails or the assumption fails, then there will be no differences! And if there will be no difference then "No one will not come to know, someone's bad part or good part too" as "Grade Creates Divides!"
Inspired By 3 idiots!
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techgeek.in's Avatar, Join Date: Dec 2009
Skilled contributor
let me explain the whole thing:-
In relative grading system the grades A,B,C... are given according to % of top students, % of middle students or % of rest students etc. For example:- If i decide a relative grading like top 20% students should be graded "A", middle 20% students "B" and rest as "C" . If the strength of the whole class is :- 100 then top 20 will get "A", next 20 will get "B" and rest will get "C". Now, suppose the professors have decided the above grading system. If the questions in the exam were very tough then it may happen so that the top 20 students may have % scores like this:-
95, 90, 85, 80, 77, 72, 67, 60, 58, 57, 54, 50, 49, 48, 47, 45, 44, 42, 40, 35......
then all the above students are graded "A". Is it not funny????? person who got 35% is "A" graded and person who got 95% is also "A" graded. It all happened due to wrong assumption. If the assumption of "A" grade had been top 5% students then the "A" graded students wud have been :-
95, 90, 85, 80, 77
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shabbir's Avatar, Join Date: Jul 2004
Go4Expert Founder
Lets make it for one more day with a hint.

HINT : What if everyone decides not to write anything in the Exam?
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31415926's Avatar, Join Date: Feb 2010
Go4Expert Member
Let a student's mark to be a outcome, then we assume that the number of different outcomes is larger than one.

If there is only one student, and there are five grades , than what grade should we assign to that student?
The relativity does not exist in this case.